Sisters in Crime

The first stage of a research project investigating Sisters in Crime (SinC) as a unique learning organization dedicated to supporting women mystery writers has now been completed. The Preliminary Results of this study overview the initial findings and early analysis on this project. In the second stage of this research project, follow-up interviews and presentations with requests for feedback to members of the organization are being conducted.

Members of Sisters in Crime who are interested in filling out the brief questionnaire are asked to read through the Informed Consent package, download the document, and return it by email either as an attachment (or pasted into the message text) to Dr. Patricia Gouthro.

Conference Presentations

Holloway, S.M., Gouthro, P.A. & Careless, E.J. (2014). Women’s experiences in learning to write fiction: Exploring variations between individual learning experiences and engagement in communities of practice. Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education Conference. Brock University, St. Catherine’s, Ontario.

Gouthro, P.A. (2013). Women of mystery: Learning pathways of female crime fiction writers. European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) Conference on Life History and Biographical Research. University of Canterbury, Canterbury, UK.

Gouthro, P.A. (2007). Learning your way into a life of crime (fiction): Assessing Sisters-in-Crime as a unique learning organization. Joint Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE). Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS. Click here for paper

Journal Articles

Gouthro, P.A. (2014). Women of mystery: Investigating learning pathways of Canadian and American female crime fiction writing. Adult Education Quarterly, 64(4), 356-373.

Gouthro, P.A. (2012). Learning your way into a life of crime (fiction): Assessing Sisters in Crime as a grassroots learning organization. The Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education. 24(2), 34-50.